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Traffic barrier produces new rat runs around King Charles Road

Traffic barrier produces new rat runs around King Charles Road

Leafy Alexandra Drive and sleepy Beaconsfield Road have become rat runs overnight after a traffic barrier was put in across King Charles Road using council emergency powers. No residents were consulted about the blockade (consisting of giant planters and posts) before it was put in place on Monday as part of a council ‘low traffic neighbourhood’ initiative,

Leafy Alexandra Drive and sleepy Beaconsfield Road have become rat runs overnight after a traffic barrier was put in across King Charles Road using council emergency powers.
No residents were consulted about the blockade (consisting of giant planters and posts) before it was put in place on Monday as part of a council ‘low traffic neighbourhood’ initiative, officially linked to the Covid crisis, “to make it easier for people to walk and cycle locally, to shop on their local high street and to reach their local green spaces, schools and NHS sites, all while maintaining physical distancing”.
Cars and vans directed along King Charles Road by their sat-navs now have to peel off along Alexandra Drive, Hollyfield Road, Beaconsfield Road and Broomfield Road, which are all now experiencing much higher traffic flows.
The aim is to stop rat-running cars dodging the Ewell Road jams by nipping along King Charles Road, but the Coffee on the Corner cafe – right next to the new barrier – is livid.
No fewer than 11 signs have been put up along King Charles Road, telling motorists that the road is closed. And that, says cafe owner Kyle Hyams, has killed off all his passing trade in a flash.
He has collected 1,000 signatures in a petition to stop the barricade (see Kyle’s petition here), and feels Lib Dem MP Ed Davey should intervene as – ironically – on recently being elected party leader he urged everyone to “wake up and smell the coffee”.
The barrier has a pair of metre-wide planters, a central padlocked pole for emergency vehicle access, and three fixed bollards so vehicles can’t sneak round on the pavement.
The experiment is due to last six months before being reviewed.
Full story and reaction in the next Good Life.
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  • Paul Fisher
    15th September 2020, 8:15 pm

    Causing untold misery for Berrylands residents & business all around the Surbiton & Tolworth area. Increased pollution. No consultation by the Lib Dem’s. OTC Coffee under threat. This crazy scheme must be stopped now !!

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